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Accueil du site → Master → Pays Bas → 2013 → Decentralisation of water supply and management and its impacts on achieving the MDGs : the case of rural water supply in Iishana sub-basin in Namibia

UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Delft (2013)

Decentralisation of water supply and management and its impacts on achieving the MDGs : the case of rural water supply in Iishana sub-basin in Namibia

Angula T.

Titre : Decentralisation of water supply and management and its impacts on achieving the MDGs : the case of rural water supply in Iishana sub-basin in Namibia

Auteur : Angula T.

Université de soutenance : UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Delft.

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2013

Résumé
Decentralisation of water supply services and management as public services in the water sector worldwide has taken center stage in bringing water services and decision making closer to those who use such services. The majority of poor rural people lack access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. Though there is noticeable progress with the provision of clean drinking water to rural areas in Iishana sub-basin, Namibia, the demand for safe drinking water still have to be met in order to achieve the MDG 7 target 10 of access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. Community participation is viewed to be the cornerstone for decentralisation of rural water supply. Thus, communities are expected to take up responsibilities for rural water supply infrastructure, including its operation and maintenance. The main objective of this research aims to contribute to the understanding of the role of decentralisation of water supply and management in achieving the MDGs in relation to rural water supply and management.The methodology used for this study is a qualitative research of a case study in Namibia in which semi-structured interviews were conducted to gauge views and perceptions of organisations involved in rural water supply. Documents and reports on the subject were reviewed to provide supplementary data collection. Results show that the decentralisation of rural water supply resulted in the deconcentration of the Directorate of Water Supply and Sanitation Coordination to Oshana region. Sanitation was delegated to Oshana Regional Council. The handing over of the rural water supply function to Oshana Regional Council as stipulated by cabinet in 2007 did not materialise at the time of this study. The legalisation of WPAs has brought about formalisation of structures for the implementation of decentralisation of rural water supply. Findings show that the creation of NAMWATER and the Directororate of Water Ssupply and Sanitation Coordination at the regional level ensures continuous supply of water to rural areas. The government aimed for the communities to take ownership and management of rural water infrastructure through the Community Based Management strategy. The launching of the Community Based Management strategy in Namibia did not come without controversy. Negative implications of costs are experienced by the Water Point Committees. Findings indicate that international donor financial assistance had greatly contributed to the acceleration of the rural water supply pipeline schemes. Despite acknowledgement by respondents on progress with access to clean water, there is no reliable scientific data to conclusively prove the role and impact of decentralisation on the MDG of access to safe clean drinking water and basic sanitation. In conclusion, it remains unclear whether the maximum distance of 2,5km set by the government to fetching water at a water point is satisfactory to users, despite services provided. The question is also posed whether 15-20 litres per person per day is sufficient for daily essential needs. The study recommends the revision of cost-recovery mechanisms to accommodate the poor rural inhabitants, better outlining of the roles of NAMWATER and DWSSC on the collection of water fees to address the economic implications experienced by Water Point Committees and the integration of sanitation in the rural water supply programme

Sujets  : rural water supply ; decentralization ; public service management ; community participation ; rural areas ; case studies ; Namibia

Présentation

Page publiée le 31 décembre 2016, mise à jour le 11 novembre 2019