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Rhodes University (2014)

The roles of black-backed jackals and caracals in issues of human-wildlife conflict in the Eastern Cape, South Africa

Murison, Megan Kate

Titre : The roles of black-backed jackals and caracals in issues of human-wildlife conflict in the Eastern Cape, South Africa

Auteur : Murison, Megan Kate

Université de soutenance : Rhodes University

Grade : Master of Science 2014

Résumé
[Partial abstract] : Human-wildlife conflict is a widely observed phenomenon and encompasses a range of negative interactions between humans and wildlife. Depredation upon livestock and game species proves to be the prevalent form of this conflict and often results in the killing of carnivores. Within the South African context, despite intense lethal control, two sympatric mesopredators, the blackbacked jackal (Canis mesomelas) and the caracal (Caracal caracal), remain common enough to be considered a major threat to human livelihoods through depredation. Wildlife ranches and livestock farms dominate the landscape in the Eastern Cape Province. Moreover, human-predator conflict within the region is extensive as both the black-backed jackal and caracal are seen to be inimical by landowners. Understanding this conflict is essential for mitigating any potential adverse environmental reactions (i.e. range collapses or extinctions) and requires knowledge of anthropogenic, ecological and environmental factors. I interviewed 73 land owners across five municipal boundaries in the Eastern Cape to quantify perceptions of predator control methods.

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Page publiée le 26 novembre 2017