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Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets 2013 → Improving Access to Safe Water, Appropriate Sanitation Facilities and Hygiene (WASH) for 12,000 Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Returnees and Urban poor Living in Emergency or Crisis at Urban Kismaayo in Juba Hoose Somalia

2013

Improving Access to Safe Water, Appropriate Sanitation Facilities and Hygiene (WASH) for 12,000 Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Returnees and Urban poor Living in Emergency or Crisis at Urban Kismaayo in Juba Hoose Somalia

Somalie

Titre : Improving Access to Safe Water, Appropriate Sanitation Facilities and Hygiene (WASH) for 12,000 Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Returnees and Urban poor Living in Emergency or Crisis at Urban Kismaayo in Juba Hoose Somalia

Pays /Région : Somalie

Code projet : CHF-DMA-O489-492

Durée : 26-JUL-2013 // 25-JUL-2014

Contexte
Kismayo is one of the last towns that have been liberated from Al Shabaab and humanitarian organizations were denied access to the town in the past years to provide assistance to the most vulnerable. According to the humanitarian snapshot for Apr 2013 in Somalia, 1.05 million people are living in Crisis and Emergency. The majority of people that are in crises are in south central Somalia, mainly in urban centers such as Kismayo. For the past 6 months the security situation has been improving and Kismayo has been accessible for humanitarian interventions. The total population of Kismayo is over 180,000 and 31,000 IDPs are scattered over 16 camps and are in need of assistance for basic services such as water, livelihoods and health (UNHCR, Apr 2013 and IOM Jan 2013). The conditions of IDPs and poor urban families living in Kismayo is 10 times worse than the IDPs in Mogadishu based on IOM’s observation. As stability is returning to the town, it also registered spontaneous returns from Kenya, particularly from Dadaab refugee camps through Dhobley and other regions in Somalia. From Mar-Apr 2013, movements in the border regions of Juba was noted to have increased from 2,500 to 3,080 (UNHCR, Apr 2013). Kismayo is one of the biggest destinations for returnees to go home or seek assistance and now IOM is setting up a transit point at the border point, Dhobley, to assist returnees with health and WASH facilities ; this project will be complementary to the ongoing below WASH activities.

Présentation
Water and sanitation conditions in Kismayo are serious ;most people use unprotected shallow wells since civil war has destroyed water infrastructure. There are four privately –owned boreholes that provide water for the entire town and the cost for 20 liter water from the borehole is 8,000 Somali Shillings, which many IDPs, poor urban families and returnees cannot buy. Thus, they have to use water from unprotected shallow wells, which are highly contaminated with human excreta. One shallow well is shared by 3,700 HH as source for drinking water, washing and cooking, which is far beyond Somalia WASH cluster standard for 500 persons per shallow well (IOM 2013). Quantity and quality of water is critical for IDPs, urban poor and returnees and there is no water treatment taking place, resulting in a daily average of 100-150 cases of Acute Watery Diarrhea reported by Kismayo hospital. Other main factors contributing are lack of basic knowledge on hygiene practices and access to sanitation facilities. A rapid assessment for WASH and health conditions conducted by IOM in Jan. 2013 in Kismayo shows that 12,000 IDPs, returnees, and urban poor (4.200 girls, 2,400 women, 3,600 boys and 1,800 men) don’’t have access to WASH services and that more than 50% of them don’t treat water before drinking, leading to a high increase in the risk of diarrhea and other water borne disease. Gender equity, especially for females, is crucial for design and location for preventing gender based violence.

Porteur du projet : IOM (International Organization for Migration)

Financement : Nations Unies

Contribution : 245,000.00 $

United Nations Development Group

Page publiée le 29 juillet 2017, mise à jour le 15 mai 2018