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Accueil du site → Master → Afrique du Sud → 2012 → Effects of feeding Moringa Oleifera leaf meal as an additive on growth performance of chicken, physico-chemical shelf-life indicators, fatty acid profiles and lipid oxidation of broiler meat

University of Fort Hare (2012)

Effects of feeding Moringa Oleifera leaf meal as an additive on growth performance of chicken, physico-chemical shelf-life indicators, fatty acid profiles and lipid oxidation of broiler meat

Wapi, Cwayita

Titre : Effects of feeding Moringa Oleifera leaf meal as an additive on growth performance of chicken, physico-chemical shelf-life indicators, fatty acid profiles and lipid oxidation of broiler meat

Auteur : Wapi, Cwayita

Université de soutenance : University of Fort Hare

Grade : Master of Science in Agriculture 2012

Résumé
Effects of feeding Moringa oleifera leaf meal as an additive on growth performance of chicken, physico- chemical shelf-life indicators, fatty acids profiles and lipid oxidation of broiler meat The main objective of the study was to determine the effect of M.oleifera leaf meal (MOLM) as an additive on growth performance, carcass characteristics, physico-chemical shelf-life indicators (colour, ultimate pH, driploss), fatty acids profiles and lipid oxidation of meat from broilers. A total of 432 1day old unsexed broiler chicks (Aviane 48) were randomly allocated to four dietary treatments (TRTS) in 72 cages. There were 18 cages per treatment and each cage allocated 6 chicks. Water and feed was provided at ad libitum. The feeding phases were, prestarter (0-7 Days), starter (8-18 Days), grower (19-28 Days), finisher (29-35 Days). The four TRTS contained graded levels of MOLM at 1000g/ton, 750g/ton, 500g/ton, and 0g/ton (control), respectively. The birds were slaughtered at 35 days of age. Breast muscles were sampled for meat, ultimate pH (pHu ), colour, drip loss over a 7 days shelf-life test. After each day’s test sub-samples were dipped in liquid nitrogen and kept at -180 C for thiobarbituric acid reactive substances determination. On Day1 and Day 7 extra sub-samples were also kept at -180 C for fatty acids analysis.The TRTS had no effect on average feed intake (AFI), feed conversion efficiency (FCE), and on average daily gain (ADG). Slaughter weight (SW), carcass weight (CW), dressing percentage and gizzard weight (GW) values were similar in all TRTS. Liver weight (LW), heart weight (HW), and gastro-intestinal fat (GIF) differed in all the TRTS, with treatment 2 having the highest value of HW (28.3±2.55), and LW (44.2±1.60) was the highest on treatment 4 . The pH values in all TRTS were constant from Day1 to Day5, reached peak on Day6, and then declined on Day7. Meat from broilers given treatment 1 with MOLM (1000g/ton) had the highest lightness (L*) values. The redness (a*) values were the highest in meat from treatment 2 (750g/ton MOLM). Treatments had no effect on yellowness (b*) values and on drip loss of the breasts. During storage L* values were high from Day1 to Day5 and decreased from Day6 to Day7. Drip loss increased with storage time as expected. Treatment 4 (control) had the highest proportions of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (30.3±1.87). Treatment 1 (1000g/ton) had the highest proportion of saturated fatty acids (SFA) (60.9±1.87). Treatment 1 (1000g/ton) had the highest proportion of SFA (60.9±4.30). Treatment 2 (750g/ton) had the highest n-6/n-3 ratio than other TRTS. Days had no effect (P>0.05) on PUFA, SFA, and n-6/n-3 ratio. Treatment 1 had a highest amount of malondialdehyde (MDA), treatment 4 had no effect (P>0.05) on MDA . Storage time had an effect (P<0.05) on MDA levels, except for on Day1 and Day7. Day2 had the highest amount of MDA (0.7±0.08). The use of MOLM as an additive in broiler diets reduced lipid oxidation in meat, and maintained the quality of the broiler meat during storage. It also did not have any adverse effects on the growth performance of broilers. Therefore, it has the potential to be used as an additive in broiler diets

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