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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Royaume-Uni → 1998 → Fulani mobility : Causes, constraints, and consequences of population movements in Northern Burkina Faso

University of London - University College London (1998)

Fulani mobility : Causes, constraints, and consequences of population movements in Northern Burkina Faso

Hampshire, Katherine Rebecca

Titre : Fulani mobility : Causes, constraints, and consequences of population movements in Northern Burkina Faso

Auteur : Hampshire, Katherine Rebecca.

Etablissement de soutenance : University of London - University College London

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy 1998

Résumé
This study examines the relationships between spatial mobility and livelihood security, social and domestic organisation and demographic parameters among the Fulani of Northern Burkina Faso. The causes and consequences of high levels of spatial mobility are investigated using methods which combine quantitative analysis with detailed qualitative understanding. Spatial mobility is found to be a response to the demands of maintaining livelihood security in a highly variable and unpredictable environment, but not in a straightforward way. Contrary to much received wisdom, temporary movements out of the rural production system are rarely poverty-driven, and are better seen as optimising strategies for already secure households rather than as coping strategies for the more vulnerable ones. Moreover, a simple economic framework is insufficient for understanding migration decisions and their consequences. Less quantifiable ethnic factors are very important and interact with economic considerations in counter-intuitive ways. Fulani domestic organisation is found to be highly flexible. Processes of household division and temporary restructuring are organised in such a way as to permit large amounts of spatial mobility without substantially altering or challenging existing power structures and social division of labour. Spatial mobility has important impacts on fertility among the Fulani. In particular, temporary male out-migration is associated with reduced fertility, largely as a result of high rates of secondary sterility among migrant communities. Indirect evidence suggests a link between secondary sterility and sexually transmitted diseases brought back by migrants. Adoption and fostering are widespread among migrant groups. This separation between biological and social parenthood offers the flexibility to cope with another potentially detrimental consequence of spatial mobility

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Page publiée le 26 juin 2018, mise à jour le 24 novembre 2019