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Michigan State University (2010)

Local perceptions of risk and vulnerability associated with human-wildlife conflicts in Namibian conservancies

Kahler, Jessica Siders

Titre : Local perceptions of risk and vulnerability associated with human-wildlife conflicts in Namibian conservancies

Auteur : Kahler, Jessica Siders

Etablissement de soutenance : Michigan State University

Grade : MASTER OF SCIENCE 2010

Résumé
In northeastern Namibia human-wildlife conflicts (HWC) pose risks to livelihoods and wildlife, creating challenges for conservancies mandated to promote conservation and sustainable development. Insights about factors influencing local stakeholders’ risk perceptions and vulnerability associated with HWC is lacking ; such information is crucial for effective management strategies. To better understand stakeholders’ perceptions of HWC-related risks to livelihoods and wildlife, I (a) assessed the effects of conservancy status on residents’ HWC-related risk perceptions in an emerging (n= 61) and established (n = 65) conservancy, (b) evaluated stakeholders perceptions of HWC-related risks relative to non-HWC related risks, and (c) described the conceptual and physical space between assessed and perceived poaching-related risks. Results show that the establishment of a conservancy influenced study residents’ characterization, prioritization and perceived severity of HWC-related risks. Additionally, non-HWC-related risks, such as lack of employment, were cited as exacerbating human and wildlife vulnerability to and decreasing stakeholder tolerance of HWC. Conservancy residents described the spatial and conceptual relationships between HWC-risks, such as crop damage and poaching, that may undermine conservation and development in their conservancies. Understanding local stakeholders’ perceptions of risks and vulnerability can inform the content, format, and design of HWC interventions and prioritize risk management and mitigation to assist the conservancies’ most HWC-vulnerable residents and promote wildlife conservation

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Page publiée le 12 octobre 2017