Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 2004 → Continuity and change : Anthropological perspectives on the informal economy in Marrakech, Morocco

Columbia University (2004)

Continuity and change : Anthropological perspectives on the informal economy in Marrakech, Morocco

Citron, Lisa Nicole

Titre : Continuity and change : Anthropological perspectives on the informal economy in Marrakech, Morocco

Auteur : Citron, Lisa Nicole

Etablissement de soutenance : Columbia University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2004

Résumé
This study considers the impact of government-imposed economic integration policies, particularly business registration and tax enrolment, on micro-scale entrepreneurs in Marrakech, Morocco. Economic formalization is currently the Moroccan government’s main strategy for the economic development and integration of the microenterprise sector, which is considered vital as a potential “engine for [economic] growth.” Through a field-based anthropological exploration of the sources of entrepreneurial success as well as the obstacles to informal sector enterprise growth, this dissertation also addresses some of the issues related to microenterprise growth as a strategy for poverty alleviation. Key issues addressed are why, when, and under what conditions entrepreneurs opt to formalize (register with the government) or remain outside of the formal economy, despite the additional costs that informality incurs. Unsurprisingly, the primary reasons for avoiding formalization are the additional financial costs it incurs, but how these costs are evaluated provides a great deal of insight into the organization of the informal sector and its role in Marrakshi society. Economic exchange, particularly market (suq)-based exchange embodies many core values in Moroccan Muslim society : hard work, piety, trust, fairness, community, and consideration for the needs of others as integral to individual business success. The awkward and reluctant integration of many entrepreneurs into the formal sector reveals a clash of values that transcends the economic and touches on a number of issues related to post-colonial Moroccan life, including income inequality, lack of opportunity and poor relations between the government and the average Moroccan citizen.

Présentation (PROQUEST)

Page publiée le 11 septembre 2017