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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 2008 → An agrarian polity and its pastoral periphery : State and pastoralism in the Borana borderlands (Southern Ethiopia), 1897–1991

Boston University (2008)

An agrarian polity and its pastoral periphery : State and pastoralism in the Borana borderlands (Southern Ethiopia), 1897–1991

Bizuneh, Belete

Titre : An agrarian polity and its pastoral periphery : State and pastoralism in the Borana borderlands (Southern Ethiopia), 1897–1991

Auteur : Bizuneh, Belete

Etablissement de soutenance : Boston University,

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2008

Résumé
This dissertation examines the history of Borana sub-province, a peripheral region that straddles the strategic borders of Ethiopia, Kenya, and Somalia. Since its conquest by the Ethiopian imperial state in the late 19th century, Borana and its Oromo- and Somali-speaking pastoral populations have experienced major political, economic and ecological changes, including the creation of an international border that bisected the previously culturally-unified populations into different states ; the introduction of new systems of economic and political control ; the rise of inter-ethnic violence among the various pastoralists of the region ; and two major trans-border insurgencies involving all three neighboring states in the region. This dissertation seeks to understand how these major political and economic events and processes transformed the lives of Borana’s pastoralists and in what ways local pastoralists responded to these challenges. The analysis is based on hitherto unutilized Ethiopian archival documents, oral interviews, and British and Kenyan documents. I argue that the need for security against neighboring states was the most important factor that shaped Ethiopia’s administrative policy towards Borana during the period 1897 to 1991. In the pre-1941 period, the Ethiopian state’s major concern in the region was to counter the perceived threat the British posed to its political and economic interests in the region. In the post-1941 period, the growth of Somali nationalism among the Somali of Borana posed a serious threat to the Ethiopian state’s authority and legitimacy in the region. An exaggerated fear of this threat led the Ethiopian state to react strongly towards all Somali in Borana that led to the outbreak of a major insurgency (1964-1970) in the region. Similar policies under the military government (1974-1991) facilitated the emergence of a second Somali-led insurgency that significantly contributed to the economic and political marginalization of the region. The Ethiopian state’s agrarian orientations also significantly impacted the state’s economic and social policies towards Borana. This study has a broader comparative value since it illuminates the problematic of nation building in peripheral borderlands in Africa and elsewhere in the world.

Présentation (PROQUEST)

Page publiée le 24 septembre 2017