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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1989 → Rural transformation and the roots of underdevelopment in Somalia’s lower Jubba Valley

University of South Carolina (1989)

Rural transformation and the roots of underdevelopment in Somalia’s lower Jubba Valley

Menkhaus, Kenneth John

Titre : Rural transformation and the roots of underdevelopment in Somalia’s lower Jubba Valley

Auteur : Menkhaus, Kenneth John

Etablissement de soutenance : University of South Carolina,

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1989

Résumé
This study investigates the historical roots of contemporary political and economic underdevelopment in Somalia’s lower Jubba Valley. Specifically, it attempts to explain the deterioration in the riverine society’s agricultural productivity, food security, and political autonomy over the past century. The riverine peasant community was in pre-colonial times noted for its "florid" surplus grain production and high levels of food security ; such an historical image stands in sharp contrast to current conditions of impoverishment in the valley. The theoretical framework of the study is informed by a political economy perspective which views economic underdevelopment as part of historical changes in patterns of state intervention into the rural economy and the development of economic classes in independent Africa. The purpose of the study is to demonstrate the explanatory power of historically-based perspectives on rural underdevelopment, to draw insights from the lower Jubba Valley’s experience with "development" of value to current development planners in Somalia, and to test a number of common propositions from the field of rural development against the historical experience of the lower Jubba community. Despite decades of successful evasion of outside attempts to exploit their land and labor, the lower Jubba population today has lost access to most of its farmland to plantations, state farms, and land speculators. The process of land concentration and exproriation that has served to impoverish the riverine community and transform it into a "semi-proletarianized" rural wage labor force is intimately related to configurations of political power in the capitol, Muqdisho. Land concentration, and the formation of economic classes in contemporary Somalia, has been a function of political power through the state rather than an economic process of differentiation.

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Page publiée le 2 février 2018, mise à jour le 21 octobre 2019