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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Royaume-Uni → 1985 → THE STATE, PEASANTS AND PASTORALISTS : AGRARIAN CHANGE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT IN NORTHERN SOMALIA, 1884-1984

University of London (1985)

THE STATE, PEASANTS AND PASTORALISTS : AGRARIAN CHANGE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT IN NORTHERN SOMALIA, 1884-1984

SAMATAR, ABDI ISMAIL

Titre : THE STATE, PEASANTS AND PASTORALISTS : AGRARIAN CHANGE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT IN NORTHERN SOMALIA, 1884-1984

Auteur : SAMATAR, ABDI ISMAIL

Etablissement de soutenance : University of London

Grade : Doctor of Philosopht (PhD) 1985

Résumé
Recent reports, of the incredible loss of human life, from the famine and drought ravaged Sub-Saharan countries are a sobering reminder of the continuing and maturing crisis that has come to symbolize African underdevelopment. In spite of the fact that Somalia has not been as hard hit by the latest wave of suffering as neighbouring Ethiopia, nevertheless, the socio-political forces that undergrid the Ethiopian catastrophe are, to an extent, present in Somalia. This dissertation is a modest attempt to delineate the origin, the nature and the evolution of these forces since the imposition of colonial rule in 1884. This research shows : (a) that colonialism meant the incorporation of pastoral (and the creation of peasant) production into the colonial capitalist economy, at the sphere of circulation, without concomitant advancement of the productive forces. This process vastly changed the logic of the pre-capitalist pastoral economy from use-value oriented production to a hybrid form in which pastoralists and peasants produce both use and exchange-values. As Professor Bernstein remarked some years ago, this process (the simultaneous production of use values and commodities by the same household) laid the basis of contemporary rural poverty. (b) that the colonial state was far from being an omnipotent force contrary to the belief that it had a free hand in shaping the colonial society. (c) that the development strategy of the post-colonial state under the tutelage of the petite-bourgeoisie, underwritten by foreign aid bypassed peasant and pastoral production has failed to create alternative regenerative domestic sources of accumulation and development. The continued involvement of peasants and pastoralist in the market and the neglect of peasant/pastoral production by the development strategy underlie the persistence and the growth of rural poverty. (d) that the emerging so-called "small-farmer" approach to rural development despite its potential for increasing agricultural production will do little to alter the poverty of the vast majority of peasants and pastoralist.

Présentation (PROQUEST)

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