Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Pays Bas → 2016 → Treesleeper Eco-camp : changing dynamics and institutions in a community-based tourism project in Namibia

Wageningen University (2016)

Treesleeper Eco-camp : changing dynamics and institutions in a community-based tourism project in Namibia

Bijsterbosch, Mariska

Titre : Treesleeper Eco-camp : changing dynamics and institutions in a community-based tourism project in Namibia

Auteur : Bijsterbosch, Mariska

Université de soutenance : Wageningen University

Grade : MSc Thesis Forest and Nature Conservation Policy 2016

Résumé partiel
Namibia has become a popular tourist destination over the years. The Namibian government is an proponent of Community-Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) and Community-Based Tourism (CBT), as these programmes aim to link conservation with development. In 2004 the community-based camp-site Treesleeper started in Tsintsabis, aiming to show the rich culture of the Hai//om and !Xun San, while creating camp possibilities for tourists, and providing an income for the Tsintsabis San community. Over the years visitor numbers increased to up to 966 in 2009, and Treesleeper became an example of a successful CBT-project. Community members fulfilled the employment-roles within Treesleeper, and an income was generated for craft sellers and traditional singers and dancers. Trainings were provided by Treesleeper, and profits were given back to the community in the form of donations. In 2009 Treesleeper received a grant from the Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET), to upgrade the camp-site to a lodge. Despite the good intentions and high expectations of this grant, the construction which started in 2011 was stopped in 2013, while none of the buildings were finished. The financial situation of Treesleeper worsened since 2013, as tourists stayed away, and not enough income was generated to support employees, nor the community of Tsintsabis. A case-study approach was used to examine what happened at Treesleeper, thereby aiming at understanding how economic, social and political aspects shaped the institutional processes in and around Treesleeper. By drawing on institutions, I explored how design principles, as created by Ostrom (1990), and later adapted by Agrawal and Chhatre (2006) and Cox et al. (2010), were reflected in Treesleeper and whether they were helpful in explaining the current situation of Treesleeper. These ten design principles are seen as prerequisites for stable and robust institutions, which are needed to have a successful and enduring CBT-project. Data for this qualitative study was gathered in the form of interviews (n=45), participant observations and documents.

Mots Clés : community tourism, institutions, design principles, Tsintsabis, Namibia

Présentation

Version intégrale (2 Mb)

Page publiée le 4 février 2018