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Dalhousie University (1993)

From therisano to participation : the theory and practice of community participation in Botswana

Rankopo, Morenaogaufi J.

Titre : From therisano to participation : the theory and practice of community participation in Botswana

Auteur : Rankopo, Morenaogaufi J.

Université de soutenance : Dalhousie University

Grade : M.S.W. 1993

Résumé
The question of community participation in local social development projects has become a central theme in many developing countries. Social development workers believe that local people must be involved in all aspects of project planning. Projects imposed from above may become white elephants because local people may not identify with them. This is a qualitative research study based on the philosophy of popular education which posits that local communities have the capacity to contribute significantly towards the improvement of their welfare. The role of the state in community participation in developing countries is explored. The objective of this study is to understand community participation structures in Bokaa, a village in Botswana. This is measured by assessing the extent to which villagers actually prevailed in the decision-making processes in two projects : the O Mang Youth Training Centre, and the Village Development Committee Housing Project. The target population in these two projects are villagers and village extension workers. A total of twenty-four and twenty-one respondents were interviewed in the two projects respectively. The focus was on villagers who were identified as active in self-help projects by key community informants. This thesis provides an insight into the originality of the projects ; the role of villagers and their elected leaders ; the role of extension workers ; and that of international development organizations. What makes this study unique is that it does not simply describe participation structures as articulated by official policy documents. Rather it critically examines these structures in practise as well as local people’s perceptions about these structures. Themes of power, gender, and the impact of Western approaches on indigenous institutions emerge.

Présentation (Amicus)

Page publiée le 2 février 2018