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2008

Environmental Change and Human Security : Recognizing and Acting on Hazard Impacts

Springer

Titre : Environmental Change and Human Security : Recognizing and Acting on Hazard Impacts

Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Environmental Change and Human Security : Recognizing and Acting on Hazard Impacts Newport, Rhode Island 4-7 June 2007

Eds : Liotta, P. ; Mouat, D.A. ; Kepner, W.G. ; Lancaster, J.M
Publisher : Springer
Date de parution  : 2008
Pages : 480 p.,

Présentation
* Compiles the most up-to-date review on human and environmental security and their linkages * Provides a provocative discussion on a newly emerging concept which seeks to link environmental condition to an evolving definition of security * Explores likely impacts of environmental change and hazards on social, economical, and political dimensions of human society * Contributes both a multi-disciplinary and multi-lateral perspective to the issue of security by combining the talents and experience of physical and social scientists * Includes case studies and examples from the Middle East, North Africa, Europe, Central Asia, and North America

Nontraditional Threats to Security The events of September 11, 2001 have sharpened the debate over the meaning of being secure. Before 9/11 there were warnings in all parts of the world that social and environmental changes were occurring. While there was prosperity in North America and Western Europe, there was also increasing recognition that local and global effects of ecosystem degradation posed a serious threat. Trekking from Cairo to Cape Town thirty years after living in Africa as a young teacher, for example, travel writer Paul Theroux concluded that development in sub-Saharan Africa had failed to improve the quality of life for 300 million people : “Africa is materially more decrepit than it was when I first knew it—hungrier, poorer, less educated, more pessimistic, more corrupt, and you can’t tell the politicians from the witch-doctors” (2002). While scholars and historians will debate the causes of 9/11 for some time, one message is clear : An often dizzying array of nontraditional threats and complex vulnerabilities define security today. We must understand them, and deal with them, or suffer the consequences. Environmental security has always required att- tion to nontraditional threats linked closely with social and economic well-being.

Présentation

Page publiée le 21 octobre 2008, mise à jour le 8 novembre 2019