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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1971 → SUBSURFACE HEAT FLOW AS A MEANS FOR DETERMINING AQUIFER CHARACTERISTICS IN THE TUCSON BASIN, PIMA COUNTY, ARIZONA

University of Arizona (1971)

SUBSURFACE HEAT FLOW AS A MEANS FOR DETERMINING AQUIFER CHARACTERISTICS IN THE TUCSON BASIN, PIMA COUNTY, ARIZONA

Supkow, Donald James.

Titre : SUBSURFACE HEAT FLOW AS A MEANS FOR DETERMINING AQUIFER CHARACTERISTICS IN THE TUCSON BASIN, PIMA COUNTY, ARIZONA

Auteur : Supkow, Donald James.

Université de soutenance : University of Arizona

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1971

Résumé
Digital computer simulations of subsurface temperature distributions for various hypothetical groundwater flow systems in which groundwater is recharged from influent streams having a mean annual temperature at or below the mean annual temperature at the land surface show that temperatures in the unsaturated zone will be depressed in proportion to the rate of groundwater flow. Field measurements of subsurface temperature distributions in the Tucson basin are consistent with temperature distribution patterns pre dicted by computer simulation. Zones of relatively rapid ground water flow near areas of natural recharge act as heat sinks causing downward flow of heat from the land surface and thereby depressing temperatures in the overlying unsaturated zone as much as three degrees Centigrade in comparison to nearby areas having relatively slow groundwater flow. A contour map of temperatures at the water table in the Tucson basin is given which shows that the lowest temperatures of about 16°C. are adjacent to zones of natural recharge whereas the highest temperatures of about 32°C. are remote from zones of natural recharge. Zones of maximum groundwater flow rates are delineated with a "valley mapping function" which defines a vector drawn in a direction normal to water-table temperature contours from low valued to high valued contours and where the spacing between contours is at a maximum. The "valley mapping function" for the Tucson basin discloses the existence of a buried dentritic channel system which is confirmed by independent studies of subsurface lithology, gravity anomolies, specific capacities of water wells, and carbon-14 ages of groundwater. Field data demonstrate that the "valley mapping function" can also be applied to contour maps of contemporaneous temperatures at a constant depth within the zone of seasonal heat penetration (0 to about 50 feet) to delineate zones of maximum groundwater flow rates even though the depth to water may be on the order of 200 feet or more.

Mots clés : Groundwater — Arizona — Pima County. ; Aquifers — Arizona — Pima County. ; Terrestrial heat flow — Arizona — Pima County.

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