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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1973 → An economic analysis of chaparral conversion on national forest lands in the Salt-Verde Basin, Arizona.

University of Arizona (1973)

An economic analysis of chaparral conversion on national forest lands in the Salt-Verde Basin, Arizona.

Brown, Thomas C.(Thomas Capnor),

Titre : An economic analysis of chaparral conversion on national forest lands in the Salt-Verde Basin, Arizona.

Auteur : Brown, Thomas C.(Thomas Capnor),

Université de soutenance : University of Arizona

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 1973

Résumé
Manipulation of dense chaparral vegetation has received considerable study in Arizona recently due to interest in increasing the water supply for the Phoenix area. Studies have shown that runoff can be significantly increased following conversion of dense chaparral to grass. Conversion also increases forage for livestock and reduces firefighting costs. In addition, conversion may have a favorable effect on recreational opportunities, esthetics, and wildlife habitat. There are roughly 850,000 acres of chaparral on National Forest land in the Salt-Verde Basin, 42 percent (353,989 acres) of which meet certain physical and managerial criteria for conversion. Found on the Tonto, Prescott, and Coconino National Forests, this acreage can be represented as 141 separate chaparral areas. A benefit-cost analysis of the 141 chaparral areas, comparing water, forage, add firefighting benefits with conversion and maintenance costs for a 50-year period, shows that conversion is economically feasible on 67 percent of the areas at a seven percent discount rate. Since only from 20 to 60 percent of each area is actually treatable, a total of 147,155 acres are economically feasible for treatment.

Mots clés : Hydrology. ; Watershed management — Arizona. ; Chaparral ecology — Arizona.

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