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University of Arizona (2001)

PRESERVING NATIVE PLANTS THROUGH REGULATION : A CASE STUDY OF THE CITY OF TUCSON’S NPPO (NATIVE PLANT PRESERVATION ORDINANCE)

GOODWIN, TROY LAWRENCE

Titre : PRESERVING NATIVE PLANTS THROUGH REGULATION : A CASE STUDY OF THE CITY OF TUCSON’S NPPO (NATIVE PLANT PRESERVATION ORDINANCE)

Auteur : GOODWIN, TROY LAWRENCE

Université de soutenance : University of Arizona

Grade : Master of Landscape Architecture 2001

Résumé
In 1997, City of Tucson implemented the Native Plant Preservation Ordinance (NPPO). The intent of the Ordinance is to protect selected native plants from development and preserve the character of the Sonoran Desert. For this study, character, termed landscape integrity, was defined by plant density, form, and richness similar to Sonoran Desert. Developers choose from four methods. The intent of this study was to determine if the use of the most commonly applied method to meet requirements of the NPPO, Plant Inventory Method (PMI), met the intent of the Ordinance. At fifteen sites, post-development evaluation was done to determine if the NPPO was accurately executed. Results indicated sites preserved only a percentage of listed NPPO species and failed to create integrity similar to the Sonoran Desert. A survey of NPPO users indicated the Ordinance is confusing to interpret and Ordinance intent is difficult to achieve. Proposed recommendations relate to increasing method’s effectiveness.

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