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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2015

Integrating Ecological Process Knowledge into Effective Management of Invasive Plants in Great Basin Rangelands

Invasive Plants Desert

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS)

Titre : Integrating Ecological Process Knowledge into Effective Management of Invasive Plants in Great Basin Rangelands

Identification : 2060-22000-024-00-D

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Start Date : Oct 15, 2015 // End Date : Oct 14, 2020

Partenaire : Great Basin Rangelands Research Reno, Nevada

Objectifs
At more than 50 million hectares, the Great Basin is the largest North American desert but also the most threatened. Great Basin ecosystems have been significantly altered by invasive annual grasses and expanding native conifer populations. This has resulted in altered fire cycles, wildlife habitat loss, and massive expenditures on rehabilitation. Over the next five years, we will conduct research to further elucidate mechanisms of invasion and develop new and evaluate current control strategies for exotic grasses and encroaching woody species in Great Basin rangelands. Objective 1 : Develop new strategies to improve the control of invasive annual grasses, especially cheatgrass and medusahead grass, in Great Basin ecosystems based on using an improved understanding of the ecology, biology, and genetic variation of these weeds and the native plant communities they are invading. Subobjective 1A : Describe and analyze the genetic structure of invasive annual grass populations. Subobjective 1B : Identify ecological associations relevant to the proliferation, impact, and control of invasive annual grasses. Subobjective 1C : Determine the effectiveness of seeding strategies on reducing invasive annual grasses and fire frequency. Subobjective 1D : Elucidate invasive-native plant associations across climatic gradients and determine native species mixes resistant to invasive annual grasses under future climate. Objective 2 : Identify and quantify the effects of integrated weed control for invasive woody plants (including pinyon, juniper, and saltcedar) on ecosystem processes, such as water cycling and seed ecology, to improve restoration and management of Great Basin ecosystems under variable climatic conditions. Subobjective 2A : Quantify the long-term effects of Diorhabda carinulata (northern tamarisk beetle) on water and carbon cycling, tree mortality, and wildlife populations in areas affected by saltcedar biological control. Subobjective 2B : Investigate adapted foundational plant materials suitable for restoration strategies in woody plant invasions to prevent secondary weed invasions. Subobjective 2C : Investigate effects of post-invasion mechanical tree control in established pinyon and juniper stands on ecohydrology and sagebrush steppe community recovery and determine the effects of native seed eating insects in reducing juniper seed viability as a pre-establishment control strategy.

Approche
Over the next 5 years, we will embark on a research program that will enhance the ability to manage invasive weeds in riparian and rangeland environments. Sagebrush habitats are at risk due to downslope expansions of woody native trees and upslope expansion of invasive annual grasses. The studies will address factors that influence the resistance and resilience of sagebrush ecosystems, that allow them to either be resistant to invasion or to recover from disturbance. We will accomplish this by integrating innovative approaches to weed control, increasing our understanding of relevant ecological processes, and providing guidelines for rehabilitation of damaged ecosystems. Specifically, we will initiate new research to describe genetic variation and the population structure of invasive annual grass species, explore biological control strategies for these grasses, and evaluate how post-fire seeding treatments affect invasive annual grass populations and wildfire frequency and severity. We will build on existing saltcedar biological control studies to promote the return of key native species and prevent secondary weed invasion, expand our mechanistic studies of pinyon- and juniper-encroached sagebrush ecosystems and of the effects of tree control treatments on these systems, and begin investigating the role of climate change in weed invasion and native species survival. If data are not available, suitable field sites cannot be found, permissions to work are not granted, or if suitablie biological candidates cannot be found, then we will modify our plans and experimental procedures as necessary.

Présentation : USDA (ARS)

Page publiée le 25 juillet 2018