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Accueil du site → Master → Etats Unis → 2016 → An Invasive Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Tephritidae), on Mango in Senegal : Impact on Mango Crop Production and Value, Marketing Practices, and Management

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (2016)

An Invasive Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Tephritidae), on Mango in Senegal : Impact on Mango Crop Production and Value, Marketing Practices, and Management

Balayara, Assa

Titre : An Invasive Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Tephritidae), on Mango in Senegal : Impact on Mango Crop Production and Value, Marketing Practices, and Management

Auteur : Balayara, Assa

Université de soutenance : Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Grade : Master of Science in Life Science In Entomology 2016

Résumé
The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel, is an economic tephritid that invaded Senegal in 2004 (Vayssieres et al. 2011). This work determined 1) Impact of B. dorsalis on mango crop production and value, and marketing practices, 2) Effect of neem and kaolin on its behavior and development (laboratory and field), and 3) Effect of treated soil with neem seed cake (NSC) and neem seed powder (NSP) on the larval-pupal survival and development (laboratory and field). Results revealed crop value (price/kg) was associated with infestation levels. P<0.0001, crop value decreased in highly infested orchards. Southern Orchards were heavily infested than northern orchards. Early harvest, orchard sanitation, decreasing the purchase quantity, sorting infested mangoes and lowering prices were strategies used by growers and traders. Laboratory bioassays showed females landed and spent time on fruit identically on control and neem. On kaolin there were fewer landings and less time spent. P<0.0001, mean pupae was higher in control than in treated mangoes. In the field, percent of infested mangoes was higher in neem than in control and kaolin. However, the number of emerged flies was higher in the control than in either the neem or kaolin-treated fruit. Treated soil with NSC and with NSP did not have effect on pupation ; all larvae pupated in the lab. However, treated soil decreased significantly the number of emerged flies. In the field, there were no significant differences between untreated and treated soil in number of emerged flies

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