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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Israel → Matching the intermittent output of renewable energy systems to the needs of an electricity grid : a mathematical study with important policy implications

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (2011)

Matching the intermittent output of renewable energy systems to the needs of an electricity grid : a mathematical study with important policy implications

Abebe Asfaw Solomon

Titre : Matching the intermittent output of renewable energy systems to the needs of an electricity grid : a mathematical study with important policy implications

Auteur : Abebe Asfaw Solomon

Etablissement de soutenance : Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2011

Résumé partiel
This study addresses the problem of how to match the intermittent output of solar and wind generators to the requirements of the electricity grid in as efficient a manner as possible. For this purpose I used a complete set of hourly generation data for the year 2006 that were kindly provided by Mr. Giora Meron of the Israel Electric Corporation (IEC). It was also necessary for me to develop a simulation model (Chapter 2) that could predict the hourly output of various types of photovoltaic (PV) plant located at a number of sites in the Negev for which appropriate meteorological data exist. Since no such local plants exist, I validated my simulation model against a full year of hourly performance figures and associated meteorological data for a large PV power plant in Arizona, USA. Data for that plant were kindly provided by Mr. Thomas Hansen of the Tucson Electric Power company (TEP). I also simulated the performance of a number of wind energy conversion systems (WECS). For this purpose I employed one of the standard predictive tools that is widely used in the wind energy literature. My first interesting finding was that a single all-day, all-year multiplicative “efficiency factor” sufficed to convert my single PV panel, DC hourly predictions into the corresponding hourly AC output of an entire system. This same multiplicative factor, the existence and value of which were strictly deduced only for a fixed, flat-panel, PV system in the Arizona desert, was then used for predicting the output of various PV systems (including also sun tracking varieties) in the Negev desert. I then constructed a mathematical algorithm (Chapter 3), based on Hadamard matrices, that enabled me to assess the grid matching capability of these intermittent energy sources with and without energy storage. I used my algorithm to examine the compatibility of these resources, both independently and in combination, with the hourly electricity demand of Israel during the year 2006. This algorithm was found strong enough to enable me to make an in-depth assessment of the various factors that limit the compatibility of intermittent energy sources with the IEC grid, and the required restructuring of grid operation and technologies that will be needed to overcome these inhibiting factors. My major task was then to assess the grid matching possibility of PV and WECS output, and to discover strategies that could enhance their grid penetration.

Présentation (BGU)

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