Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Afrique du Sud → 2016 → Working for ecosystems : an account of how pathways of learning lead to SMME development in a municipal social-ecological programme within a green economy context

Rhodes University (2016)

Working for ecosystems : an account of how pathways of learning lead to SMME development in a municipal social-ecological programme within a green economy context

Burger, Margaret Hendrieka Margo

Titre : Working for ecosystems : an account of how pathways of learning lead to SMME development in a municipal social-ecological programme within a green economy context

Auteur : Burger, Margaret Hendrieka Margo

Université de soutenance : Rhodes University

Grade : Master of Education (Environmental Education) 2016

Résumé
Global climate change alters climatic zones to the extent that species invasion and, in particular, invasive alien plant growth, is regarded as one of the biggest threats to ecosystem functioning. Socio-ecological adaptive management practices have emerged from these threats as opportunities in developing countries where the immediacy of poverty relief acts as a political drawcard and potential for job creation. Local workers in the eThekwini Municipality’s ‘Working for Ecosystems’ biodiversity management programme (WFE) are emerging as micro-enterprise contractors (SMMEs). The transition from worker to entrepreneur has been part of the ethos and long-term planning of the Working for Ecosystems programme at a management level with a view to economic inclusion and realising long-term sustainable livelihoods. Evidence from narratives support claims of transformative outcomes. The findings of this study show that transformation is accessed at various levels : at a management level, at a well-established SMME level and from worker-to- SMME level. These show an “articulation of learning pathways and the connections that are made without a formally structured pathway of learning being in place” (Lotz-Sisitka & Ramsarup, 2013, p. 33). The routes followed to knowledge, practice and sustainability competences by participants in Working for Ecosystems are examined within the complex constellation of material- economic, social-political and cultural-discursive structures and are conceptualised as learning pathways. To fully appreciate the evolving and multidimensional nature of the emergence of SMME practice learning in the Working for Ecosystems programme, relational ontology as a perspective was introduced, with the intention of emphasising the relationship between practice, knowledge and context. Narrative enquiry and extensive data analysis was used as the method to examine workplace learning pathways. These workplace learning pathways can be enriched by more explicitly integrating observation of local and indigenous knowledge of biodiversity in everyday work and practice. However, intermittent contractual work causes disruption in learning pathways formation and results in a lack of stability in conflict with the aims of the programme’s objectives of building capacity and robustness. Findings show that skills development in terms of workplace learning with intersecting, diverse levels of participation and knowledge flow, is particularly important for learning pathways development in the field of invasive alien plant control where divergent values, norms and levels of practice are operational. Prior knowledge, of either indigenous plants or business functioning mechanisms, scaffolds SMME skills through relevance and connected learning in the two fields of practice pertaining to the Working for Ecosystems programme. Clarity of management roles and solidarity within management enhances SMME functioning and learning pathway development for all participants. The Expanded Public Works Programmes (such as Working for Ecosystems) are examined as an opportunity for acquisition of knowledge, competence and new skills development. A prime competence for sustainability understanding is interpersonal skills as these form an essential link with most other competences and as such should be foregrounded in training and learning pathway development. Site selection and time in the programme is a critical factor for expansive learning pathways and environmental stewardship development. Ultimately, in examining and reflecting on the Education for Sustainable Development and green economy potential, it is apparent that learning pathway development needs more support to realise the possibility of entrepreneurship and its political and social significance in terms of sustainable livelihoods. There is a need to recognise diversity, multiple ways of knowing and learning, in learning pathways development “to b

Présentation (SEALS)

Version intégrale (21 Mb)

Page publiée le 17 décembre 2018