Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Doctorat → Australie → Evaluation of insect monitoring radar technology for monitoring locust migrations in inland Eastern Australia

University of New South Wales (2008)

Evaluation of insect monitoring radar technology for monitoring locust migrations in inland Eastern Australia

Wang, Haikou

Titre : Evaluation of insect monitoring radar technology for monitoring locust migrations in inland Eastern Australia

Auteur : Wang, Haikou

Université de soutenance : University of New South Wales

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy PhD 2008

Résumé
To evaluate the utility of insect monitoring radar (IMR) technology for long-term monitoring of insect migration, a mini-network of two IMR units in Bourke, NSW, and Thargomindah, QLD, and a base-station server in Canberra, ACT, was set up in eastern Australia. The IMR operated automatically every night under the control of a personal computer that also conducted data acquisition and processing. Digitisation of radar signals, their analysis (delimitation of echoes from background noise and adjoining echoes, followed by extraction of estimates for each target’s speed, displacement direction, body alignment, radar cross-section, and wingbeat frequency and modulation pattern), and generation of observation summaries were implemented as a fully automated procedure. Wingbeat frequency was found to be retrievable from the IMR’s rotary-beam signals, and this allowed each individual target to be characterised by its wingbeat as well as its size and shape. By drawing on ancillary information from the Australian Plague Locust Commission’s database of field survey and light trap records, the echo characters indicative of Australian plague locust, Chortoicetes terminifera (Walker), were identified. Using these, about 140 nights with detectable plague locust migrations were identified for the Bourke IMR site during 1998 - 2001 and 31 nights for Thargomindah during 1999 - 2000. Analysis of these nights confirmed that C. terminifera migrates in association with disturbed weather, especially tropical troughs, in eastern Australia. Trajectory simulation based on IMR-derived displacement directions and flight speeds allowed the identification of population movements likely to reach favourable habitats and thus to develop rapidly and possibly cause a plague. The outbreak during 1999 - 2001 most likely originated from the south-eastern agricultural belt after migrations and multiplications over several generations. The IMR observations demonstrated that C. terminifera migrates over long distances with the wind at night and indicated that it may have an orientation behaviour that prevents it from being taken too far into the arid inland, a trait that could be highly adaptive in this environment. The two IMRs were operational for more than 85% of scheduled time during the study period and provided a wealth of information of potential value for locust management and migration research

Mots clés : Radar, Insects, Migration, IMR, Migratory locust, Plague locust, Australia

Présentation

Version intégrale

Page publiée le 6 mars 2009, mise à jour le 15 juillet 2017