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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1981 → THE RENDILLE AGE-SET SYSTEM IN ETHNOGRAPHIC CONTEXT : ADAPTATION AND INTEGRATION IN A NOMADIC SOCIETY (PASTORALISM ; EAST AFRICA, KENYA)

Boston University (1981)

THE RENDILLE AGE-SET SYSTEM IN ETHNOGRAPHIC CONTEXT : ADAPTATION AND INTEGRATION IN A NOMADIC SOCIETY (PASTORALISM ; EAST AFRICA, KENYA)

Beaman, Anne

Titre : THE RENDILLE AGE-SET SYSTEM IN ETHNOGRAPHIC CONTEXT : ADAPTATION AND INTEGRATION IN A NOMADIC SOCIETY (PASTORALISM ; EAST AFRICA, KENYA)

Auteur : Beaman, Anne

Université de soutenance : Boston University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1981

Résumé
This dissertation deals with the Rendille people : a nomadic pastoral society of northern Kenya with a mixed-species livestock economy focused on camels as a primary species, an East Cushitic language closely related to Somali, and an intricate age-set system that combines elements of chronological age, genealogical generation, and calendrical time. The dual purpose of this work is to present a detailed descriptive ethnography of the society (Part I), and to describe and analyze the age-set system in the context of the total culture (Part II). The age-set system, previously described by Paul Spencer (1973) as a derivative of the age-set system of the Nilotic Samburu, is reinterpreted on the basis of more complete data as an inherently Cushitic system, similar to but independent of the Samburu system, and perhaps resembling that which gave rise many centuries ago to other Cushitic and, subsequently, Nilotic age-set systems in the Lake Turkana region. Cross-cultural comparison and the structural analytical methods of Frank H. Stewart (1977) are used in the analysis. The work, based on fieldwork undertaken between 1976 and 1979, was inspired in part by the work of Harold C. Fleming (1965). Fleming’s cross-cultural historical study of age-grading societies of East Africa hypothesized a major impact on area cultures by early contact between the Nilotes and the Cushitic ancestors of today’s Rendille and Somali peoples.

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