Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1983 → CATTLEMEN, BOREHOLE SYNDICATES AND PRIVATIZATION IN THE KGATLENG DISTRICT OF BOTSWANA : AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL HISTORY OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF A COMMONS

Boston University (1983)

CATTLEMEN, BOREHOLE SYNDICATES AND PRIVATIZATION IN THE KGATLENG DISTRICT OF BOTSWANA : AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL HISTORY OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF A COMMONS

Peters, Pauline

Titre : CATTLEMEN, BOREHOLE SYNDICATES AND PRIVATIZATION IN THE KGATLENG DISTRICT OF BOTSWANA : AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL HISTORY OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF A COMMONS

Auteur : Peters, Pauline

Université de soutenance : Boston University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1983

Résumé
This dissertation presents an anthropological history of changing patterns of resource control which seeks to grasp the dynamic of the transformation of a commons. In the late 1920s boreholes, or deep-bore wells, were introduced into the Kgatleng, and syndicates, or groups of cattle-owners who jointly owned and managed the wells, were formed soon thereafter. The central thesis that a transformation of the commons has been taking place in the Kgatleng contains three related propositions. First, the establishment of permanent water-points under private ownership within the communally-held grazing areas has led, over half a century, to a gradual privatization of the grazing land despite its continued formal designation as "communal." Secondly, the changing patterns of access to water sources and to pastures in the grazing areas are central features in the forms and processes of socioeconomic differentiation and class formation that have emerged over this period. Thirdly, the syndicate, as a group form of ownership, has played a central and facilitating role in privatization, yet its very cultural definition and social organization constitute a hurdle to recent policy introducing leasehold rights to grazing areas. The syndicate’s paradoxical role results from its mediating, through an ideology of collective action an incorporative mode of organization, the contradictory processes that derive from introducing privately-owned boreholes into a grazing commons. The following are the social conditions within which this contradiction generates conflict between different categories of BaKgatla. The fixity of boreholes as water sources in a semi-arid environment, their high capital and operating costs, and the increasing demands on pasture use have all combined to reduce herd mobility, to increase borehole owners’ control over surrounding pastures, and to encourage greater closure of syndicate organizational boundaries. The de facto control of land has acquired a certain legitimacy from both customary Kgatla formulations of grazing rights and an administrative procedure in borehole allocation. Such pressures towards exclusive access to water and pasture have been buttressed by the growing dominance of an ideology and practice of exclusive rights and a corollary denigration of the commons.

Search Oxford Libraries On Line (SOLO)

ProQuest Dissertations Publishing

Page publiée le 16 mai 2019