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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Australie → 1990 → Water use, water use efficiency and yield in dryland grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench)

University of Queensland (1990)

Water use, water use efficiency and yield in dryland grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench)

Peries, R. Renick. A.

Titre : Water use, water use efficiency and yield in dryland grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench)

Auteur : Peries, R. Renick. A

Université de soutenance : University of Queensland

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1990

Résumé
Grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) is commonly grown as a dryland summer crop in the arid and semi-arid regions of Australia and elsewhere. The inadequate availability of water during crop growth has been recognized as the major constraint limiting its growth and yield development.

Under water limiting conditions, grain yield can be expressed as the product of water use (WU), water use efficiency (WUE) and harvest index (HI). Water use by the crop includes both water transpired (T) as well as that lost through soil evaporation (Es), in addition to run-off and deep percolation. Evapotranspiration (Es+T) may be increased by growing a crop which is late maturing or which may extract soil water more thoroughly. WUE is defined as TDM/WU (TDM : total dry matter) and it may be increased if the Es component is reduced so that more soil water will be available for transpiration. HI may be affected by the pattern of water use ; if stored water is used early in the season the crop may run out of water before maturity and grain yield will be adversely affected with resultant low HI.

The objective of the work reported in this thesis was to examine the effect of different agronomic practices on Es+T, WUE and HI in grain sorghum. Seven field experiments were conducted over three seasons (1985 to 1988) in the grain growing regions of south east Queensland.

The first experiment was conducted at Gatton to examine if the pattern of water use was affected by genotypic differences, agronomic practices or artificial crop manipulation. The particular objective was to find out if any treatment with reduced light interception will result in reduced use of water before booting, allowing this saved water to be used during grain filling. ......

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