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University of Cape Town (2000)

The natural enemies of Asparagus asparagoides (L.) Wight in South Africa and their potential for use as biological control agents in Australia

Kleinjan, C A

Titre : The natural enemies of Asparagus asparagoides (L.) Wight in South Africa and their potential for use as biological control agents in Australia

Auteur : Kleinjan, C A

Université de soutenance : University of Cape Town.

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2000

Résumé
A form of the southern African plant Asparagus asparagoides (Asparagaceae), is a serious environmental week in Australia, where it is known as bridal creeper. Bridal creeper has an extensive underground tuber system and can invade native vegetation, two factors that make chemical and/or mechanical control difficult. The fruit is bird dispersed which facilitates colonisation of new sites. Surveys for potential biological control agents for use against bridal creeper in Australia were initiated in South Africa during 1989. This dissertation describes the identification, distribution and phenology of A. asparagoides in South Africa, as well as the natural enemies associated with the plant and their potential for use as biological control agents in Australia. Potential biological control agents that attack vegetative growth of bridal creeper included an undescribed Zygina sp. (Cicadellidae), two undescribed Crioceris species (Chrysomelidae - Criocerinae) and the rust fungus, Puccinia myrsiphlli DC. (Uredinales). The seeds of bridal creeper are attacked by an undescribed Eurytoma sp. (Eurytomidae) and the fruits by Zalaca snelleni (Wallengren) (Noctuidae). An organism directly attacking the tuber mass of bridal creeper was not found. Experimental results illustrated that herbivore damage to the above ground parts of the plant resulted in reduced tuber mass and also impacted negatively on fruit production.

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Page publiée le 13 janvier 2019