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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1992 → An economic analysis of factors affecting millet production and transactions in the peanut basin of Senegal

Michigan State University (1992)

An economic analysis of factors affecting millet production and transactions in the peanut basin of Senegal

Ndoye, Ousseynou

Titre : An economic analysis of factors affecting millet production and transactions in the peanut basin of Senegal

Auteur : Ndoye, Ousseynou

Etablissement de soutenance : Michigan State University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1992

Résumé
The main objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the millet subsector in Senegal and to determine the prerequisites to achieving the government’s objective of encouraging local cereals production for consumption. The study relied on primary data collected from samples of 160 farm households between October 1986 and September 1987, 18 markets between October 1984 and December 1989, and 66 wholesalers between October 1986 and September 1988. The study found that only 16 percent of household heads in the Northern and the Central Peanut Basin were capable of producing enough millet to cover 6 months of consumption. In the Southern Peanut Basin 82 percent of household heads were capable of producing enough millet to feed their dependents for an entire year. Seventy-four percent of household heads in the entire sample were net buyers of millet. The percentage of millet production marketed was low, indicating that the markets are thin. The extent to which household heads sell millet at harvest and buy back was investigated in the study. The results implied that when markets are uncertain, the behavior of prices may provide losses as well as occasional windfall gains for farmers who sell at harvest and buy back later. The analysis of temporal market integration indicated that millet storage was very risky due to uncertainties about markets and the price volatility. As a result, it is not in private traders’ interest to get involved in long-term storage. The study also found evidence of efforts by farmers to reduce risk through the use of informal social contracts. The evidence of farmer solidarity seems to indicate that a traditional "safety net" is already in place in rural areas, which should be explored by the government for the design of the future cooperatives.

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