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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2019

TARGETING FUNCTIONAL TRAIT AND GENETIC VARIABILITY FOR IMPROVED ESTABLISHMENT OF RESTORATION SPECIES

Genetic Restoration Arid

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Titre : TARGETING FUNCTIONAL TRAIT AND GENETIC VARIABILITY FOR IMPROVED ESTABLISHMENT OF RESTORATION SPECIES

Identification : COL0-2018-07872

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : START : 15 MAY 2019 // TERM : 14 MAY 2021

Résumé
Arid and semi-arid rangelands sustain approximately one-third of the world’s population, 50% of the world’s livestock, and a third of the world’s biodiversity hot spots. However, rangeland ecosystems are highly susceptible to land degradation and ecological restoration success in these systems is devastatingly poor - often as low as 5% in the Western United States. Competition from exotic species and drought greatly hinder restoration efforts. When site conditions are predictable, cultivars with specific traits or characteristics can be used to improve initial plant establishment. However, given the uncertainty of exotic species invasion and seasonal precipitation, selecting seeds from populations with varied traits and high genetic diversity may maximize initial establishment and adaptive potential of introduced plant populations.We will conduct a series of greenhouse and field experiments that synthesize genetic and trait-based approaches to address the overarching goal of advancing knowledge about how functional-trait variability and genetic diversity influence plant establishment under varied environmental conditions. Specifically, we aim to understand whether seeds from functionally and genetically diverse grass populations will have improved establishment, performance, and survival under opposing stressors of drought and competition as compared to seeds from populations with lower trait and genetic diversity.Data from this research will inform the design of restoration seed mixes and management of restored plant populations that are resilient to changing environmental conditions. This study will provide a model framework for similar investigations of important restoration species and will advance understanding of plant population dynamics in many contexts including conservation biology and invasion ecology. Improved establishment of slender wheatgrass and other native species in rangeland restoration will enhance ecosystem productivity, promote diverse ecosystem services, and reduce the cost of re-vegetation projects.

Performing Institution : COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORT COLLINS, COLORADO 80523
Investigator : Garbowski, M.

Financement : $87,286

Présentation : USDA (NIFA)

Page publiée le 26 décembre 2019