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Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets de recherche pour le Développement → 2018 → CAN SHEEP, CATTLE, AND PATCH-BURNING ENHANCE RANGELAND DIVERSITY IN THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS ?

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2018

CAN SHEEP, CATTLE, AND PATCH-BURNING ENHANCE RANGELAND DIVERSITY IN THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS ?

Rangelend Great Plain

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Titre : CAN SHEEP, CATTLE, AND PATCH-BURNING ENHANCE RANGELAND DIVERSITY IN THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS ?

Identification : ND05908

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : START : 15 APR 2018 // TERM : 14 APR 2020

Résumé
Patch burn-grazing promotes sustainable livestock production and conservation through management of spatially-patchy prescribed fire. Although benefits of patch burn-grazing have been demonstrated in the Southern Great Plains, little work has been done in the Northern Great Plains, and none involving sheep, an economically-important grazer. There is a critical need to determine how patch burn-grazing delivers supporting and provisioning ecosystem services related to livestock production and enhances pollinators and necessary floral resources in the unique agro-ecosystems of the Northern Great Plains. Without such an understanding, ecosystem service delivery from rangelands in the region will decline under overstocking and conversion to row-crops. In this project we will develop foundational research on the feasibility of patch burn-grazing in semi-arid rangeland of southwestern North Dakota, comparing the relative effects of cattle and sheep on landscape diversity through vegetation structure and composition. We predict patchy fire will concentrate grazing into the most recently-burned patch, which we will measure with spatial tracking of grazer activity. We also predict spatially-concentrated grazing will create contrast in vegetation structure through the grazing season, which will promote and stabilize floral resources for pollinators. These data set-up research on specific livestock production and conservation responses to patch burn-grazing in semi-arid, northern rangeland. By demonstrating feasibility of patch burn-grazing in the Northern Great Plains, this project establishes our Research Extension Center as a core demonstration site for a full proposal aimed at landowner adoption specifically focused on re-distributing stocking pressure in the landscape to promote heterogeneity and ecosystem service delivery.

Performing Institution : NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA 58105
Investigator : McGranahan, D. A.

Financement : $149,000

Présentation : USDA (NIFA)

Page publiée le 10 décembre 2019