Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Norvege → Uncovering the Impacts of Fencing in the Mara : An assessment of vegetation and bare soil using remote sensing and stakeholder participation

Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) 2019

Uncovering the Impacts of Fencing in the Mara : An assessment of vegetation and bare soil using remote sensing and stakeholder participation

Coleman, Kjirsten E.R.

Titre : Uncovering the Impacts of Fencing in the Mara : An assessment of vegetation and bare soil using remote sensing and stakeholder participation

Auteur : Coleman, Kjirsten E.R.

Université de soutenance : Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Grade : Master’s thesis in Natural Resources Management 2019

Résumé
Land-use and land cover change (LULCC) detection studies often utilize remote sensing for ecological monitoring and management, conservation, and quantification of land-cover change. Remote sensing is an effective tool for these applications but can be imperfect as it tends to be one-dimensional. Understanding human-resource interactions is essential to interpretation and management implementation of remote sensing studies. Increasingly, studies have begun to integrate indigenous and local knowledge (ILK) to gain a better understanding of the changes detected from satellite data. Here we conducted a Before-After Impact-Control Paired (BACIP) study on the effects of recent fence construction in pastoral communities near the border of Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya. In this study we detected the impact of fencing on two remotely sensed indices, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the bare-soil index (BI). We engaged ILK through stakeholder perceptions of changes in greenness (NDVI) and bareness (BI) before and after fencing. We found that wet season BI decreased by 87.1% inside fences, while variability in wet season NDVI increased by 33% inside fences, post-construction. Wet season mean NDVI increased within fences but was not significant. This result was misaligned with our prediction that local stakeholders would corroborate the NDVI findings. However, wet season BI results were corroborated by interviews with local and high-level stakeholders. Changes in dry season NDVI and BI were not due to the impact of fences. Spatially and temporally varied land-use practices inside fenced areas may account for wet season NDVI variability and mean BI increases after fence construction.

Présentation

Version intégrale (21,3 Mb)

Page publiée le 25 mars 2020