Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 2016 → DOMESTIC ANIMALS AND DRINKING WATER CONTAMINATION IN PERI-URBAN HOUSEHOLDS OF KISUMU, KENYA

University of Florida (2016)

DOMESTIC ANIMALS AND DRINKING WATER CONTAMINATION IN PERI-URBAN HOUSEHOLDS OF KISUMU, KENYA

BARNES AMBER N.

Titre : DOMESTIC ANIMALS AND DRINKING WATER CONTAMINATION IN PERI-URBAN HOUSEHOLDS OF KISUMU, KENYA

Auteur : BARNES AMBER N.

Université de soutenance : University of Florida

Grade : DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PhD) 2016

Résumé
Humans and domestic animals share close environments across the globe. In the larger community, animal products are moved through formal and informal sectors to supply consumers with valuable commodities such as meat, dairy, and eggs. At the household level, these items provide protein-rich foods that while vital to nutrition, may not be affordable without animal ownership. However, close contact with animals in public and private domains can increase the risk for zoonoses, particularly zoonotic enteric disease. In Kisumu, Kenya, the city infrastructure has created pockets of informal settlements. These slum areas experience high levels of infectious disease, often related to inadequate access to water and sanitation. Urban and peri-urban agriculture and animal husbandry is common to these communities and contributes to the overall disease burden through risky animal care and management practices, improper drinking water treatment and storage, unsafe food preparation and handling, and unhygienic personal behaviors. This research addressed the issue of household water contamination associated with domestic animals in Kisumu, Kenya through three separate studies. First, the role of domestic animals in peri-urban households was investigated through a household survey with residents of the slum communities. also served to identify risk factors. Second, samples of drinking water were analyzed for fecal contamination. The presence or absence of domestic animals in the household and compound were measured as drivers of water contamination. And third, spatial analysis was utilized to explore patterns of water contamination rates and the presence of domestic animals or animal waste to determine ‘hotspots’ of potential zoonotic disease risk. Together this research provides essential information on the relationship between domestic animals and drinking water safety in peri-urban communities of Kisumu, Kenya. From this, One Health interventions and public health messages can be created to better protect these residents from zoonotic enteric disease.

Version intégrale

Page publiée le 28 octobre 2019