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Wageningen University (2019)

Pastoralism vs. conservation - Livelihoods and conservancies in the pastoralist areas, Kenya

Doller, Rianne

Titre : Pastoralism vs. conservation - Livelihoods and conservancies in the pastoralist areas, Kenya

Auteur : Doller, Rianne

Université de soutenance : Wageningen University

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2019

Résumé
In the pastoralist areas of Northern Kenya, nomadic livestock keeping is the main livelihood approach. However, there are challenges such as climate change, increasing droughts, ecosystem degradation and competing land uses impacting livelihoods. Changes in the pastoralist society also impact on livelihoods such as changing governance systems and cultural changes. Another livelihood approach in the pastoralist areas is conservation benefits from dedicated conservation areas. High-end luxury tourism is the main attempt at making a profit. Local people should be involved in tourism operations and get benefits to compensate for land lost. The thesis researches the opposing livelihood approaches of livelihood versus conservation. For that, stakeholders are interviewed during a six-month stay. The conclusion of the research is that the benefits of tourism don’t materialize for the people and that they have little involvement in the tourism operations. It is recommended to start low-budget tourism which offers wildlife viewing combined with the local culture. Low-budget allows the pastoralist people to start-up initiatives for themselves and to offer cultural activities fitting within their capacities. Combining pastoralism and conservation moves beyond Western hegemonic conservation thinking of nature parks and considers the local setting of pastoralism in Kenya.

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Page publiée le 5 novembre 2019