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Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTH) 2012

Impact of land cover change on soil erosion hazard in northern jordan using remote sensing and GIS

Alkarabsheh Mohammad Minwer

Titre : Impact of land cover change on soil erosion hazard in northern jordan using remote sensing and GIS

Επιπτώσεις της αλλαγής κάλυψης γης για την επικινδυνότητα της διάβρωσης του εδάφους στη βόρεια Ιορδανία τη χρήση τηλεπισκόπησης και ΓΣΠ

Auteur : Alkarabsheh Mohammad Minwer (Αλχαραπσε Μοχαμεντ)

Etablissement de soutenance : Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTH)

Grade : Master 2012

Résumé
Jordan is a country dominated by arid and fragile ecological systems. It receives little rainfall, with 90 per cent of the country receiving less than 200mm a year, which makes land degradation, soil erosion and desertification important areas of interest. This study is aimed to assess the impact of land cover change on the erosion in agricultural areas in north Jordan. This was done by quantifying and analyzing the soil erosion in the north of Jordan between the years 1992 – 2009, and by estimating the C factor values using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). The RUSLE model was used in a GIS environment to create soil erosion maps at the requested times. The RUSLE equation contains factors obtained from meteorological stations, soil surveys, topographic maps, satellite images and results of other relevant studies. The RUSLE model was successfully applied and the C factor was well derived from the NDVI, the mean erosion loss is 9.53 t/hr and 8.97 t/hr in 1992 and 2009. The impact of LULC change on the soil erosion was studied by comparing the change of erosion risk levels with available LULC maps of the study area using geographic overlay analysis. The differences in soil erosion risk between the two years were significant ; this gives a clear indication that changes in LULC affects significantly the soil erosion rate. The result of this model would have been more accurate if support practices could be modeled, multi-temporal satellite images and more rainfall data had been available.

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