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How rattlesnakes’ scales help them sip rainwater from their bodies

ScienceDaily (January 8, 2020)

Titre : How rattlesnakes’ scales help them sip rainwater from their bodies

ScienceDaily (January 8, 2020)

Résumé
During storms in the southwestern US, some rattlesnakes drink rain droplets from scales on their backs. This unusual behavior could help them survive in a desert environment with infrequent rain. Now, researchers have figured out how the nanotexture of scales from these snakes helps them use their bodies to harvest rain.

The western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) from southern Arizona and other areas of the U.S. Southwest has been seen emerging from its den to harvest rain, sleet and even snow. The snake flattens its body and often forms a tight coil, presumably to maximize the area for water-gathering. As rain droplets coalesce on its back, the slithery reptile sucks water from the scales. Gordon Schuett, Konrad Rykaczewski and colleagues wanted to take a closer look at rattlesnake scales to determine what makes these serpents so adept at harvesting precipitation.

Story Source  : American Chemical Society

Annonce (ScienceDaily)

Page publiée le 6 juin 2020