Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Afrique du Sud → 2019 → Characterization of bacterial species in Steinkopf a communal farming area in South Africa : A closer look at pathogenesis

University of the Western Cape (2019)

Characterization of bacterial species in Steinkopf a communal farming area in South Africa : A closer look at pathogenesis

Foster, Jodene

Titre : Characterization of bacterial species in Steinkopf a communal farming area in South Africa : A closer look at pathogenesis

Auteur : Foster, Jodene

Université de soutenance : University of the Western Cape

Grade : Magister Scientiae (Biodiversity and Conservation Biology) - MSc (Biodiv & Cons Biol) 2019

Résumé partiel
The human population in sub-Saharan Africa has been increasing due to decreases in mortality rates and increases in average human age ; in turn increasing poverty and pressure placed on agriculture and agricultural production. However, livestock production in South Africa, and globally, is declining due to disease and parasite prevalence, lack of feed, poor breeding, marketing management, change in nutrition in both livestock and humans, rapid urbanization, encroachment on wildlife and unfavourable climatic conditions brought about by global change. One unintended consequence has been the emergence and spread of transboundary animal diseases and, more specifically, the resurgence and emergence of zoonotic disease. Zoonotic diseases are sicknesses transmissible from animals to humans, resulting from direct contact or environmental reservoirs. Previous studies have identified small-scale farmers as the group most prevalent to contracting zoonotic diseases, especially those working in a communal dispensation. Therefore, this study focused on the communal farming area of Steinkopf in the semi-arid Namaqualand region of South Africa. Steinkopf is one of the largest Act 9 areas, with communal land tenure and a mixed farming system, sheep and goats, on about 759 ha. Steinkopf is divided into two rainfall regions, the Succulent Karoo (winter rainfall region) and the Nama Karoo (summer rainfall region). This study aims to identify and characterise the bacterial microbial communities found in the topsoil layer and faecal matter (dung) within the winter and summer rainfall regions of Steinkopf communal rangeland using Next-generation sequencing. Further, the aim is to assess whether pathogenic bacteria are present within the rangeland and what their potential impact on the local farming community might be if present. A high-throughput sequencing technique (Next-generation sequencing) was used to amplify 16S rRNA targeting the V3-V4 hypervariable regions.

Présentation

Version intégrale (4,38 Mb)

Page publiée le 26 mai 2020