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Accueil du site → Master → Afrique du Sud → 2019 → Benefit sharing and environmental sustainability in policy and practice : the commercialisation of the resurrection bush (Myrothamnus flabellifolius) in Southern Africa

University of Cape Town (2019)

Benefit sharing and environmental sustainability in policy and practice : the commercialisation of the resurrection bush (Myrothamnus flabellifolius) in Southern Africa

Nott, Michelle

Titre : Benefit sharing and environmental sustainability in policy and practice : the commercialisation of the resurrection bush (Myrothamnus flabellifolius) in Southern Africa

Auteur : Nott, Michelle

Université de soutenance : University of Cape Town.

Grade : Master of Arts in Environmental and Geographical Science 2019

Résumé partiel
The trade of non-timber forest products (NTFPs), also known as biotrade, has existed for hundreds of years - as has the traditional knowledge associated with such products. More recently, this form of trade has advanced to include genetic resource components found within natural resources (bioprospecting). International agreements such as the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and Nagoya Protocol came into force in 1993 and 2010 respectively, to ensure that biological diversity is conserved, sustainably utilised, and that the benefits arising from the utilisation of genetic resources and/or associated traditional knowledge are shared in an equitable manner. In practice, however, there is a lack of evidence to suggest whether the provisions of the CBD and Nagoya Protocol are being adequately implemented and achieved. This research focuses on the commercialisation of the resurrection bush (Myrothamnus flabellifolius) in Zimbabwe, Namibia and South Africa and critically evaluates how the requirements of the CBD and Nagoya Protocol are applied. The resurrection bush spans a number of countries and has been used traditionally by a variety of ethnic communities residing in Africa. Traditional medicinal uses for the resurrection bush include using the plant to treat colds and flu, scurvy, coughs, abdominal pain, epilepsy, and asthma. This study aims to uncover and understand the way in which benefit sharing and environmental sustainability are interpreted and implemented in various resurrection bush commercialisation approaches. Six objectives are articulated to achieve this aim : (1) to review the historical use and traditional knowledge associated with the resurrection bush ; (2) to describe the different ways the resurrection bush is commercialised and the different processes each commercialisation strategy follows ; (3) to describe the actors involved in the different resurrection bush commercialisation strategies and their roles in the commercialisation process ; (4) to explore, within each commercialisation strategy, how commercial actors gain access to resources ; (5) to describe and analyse the range of benefits derived from each commercialisation approach ; and (6) to assess the policy implications and practical applications of current resurrection bush commercialisation approaches.

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