Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Afrique du Sud → 2018 → Perceptions, determinants and consumption patterns of indigenous fruits and vegetables in rural areas : evidence from Mutale Local Municipality, Limpopo Province, South Africa

University of Fort Hare (2018)

Perceptions, determinants and consumption patterns of indigenous fruits and vegetables in rural areas : evidence from Mutale Local Municipality, Limpopo Province, South Africa

Nengovhela, Rudzani

Titre : Perceptions, determinants and consumption patterns of indigenous fruits and vegetables in rural areas : evidence from Mutale Local Municipality, Limpopo Province, South Africa

Auteur : Nengovhela, Rudzani

Université de soutenance : University of Fort Hare

Grade : Masters of Science in Agriculture (Agricultural Economics) 2018

Résumé
Rural households across South Africa experience food and nutrition insecurity. Given the fact that indigenous fruits and vegetables (IF&Vs) have numerous health benefits including their wide availability and accessibility in rural areas, these indigenous varieties can significantly contribute to food and nutrition security in rural household. However, the consumption of IF&Vs in recent years has generally remained low and has been declining. The present study investigated the perceptions of IF&Vs, consumption patterns and determinants of IF&V consumption among 200 rural households (n = 200) from 10 villages within the Mutale Local Municipality of Limpopo Province, South Africa. The results revealed that, respondents held overwhelmingly positive perceptions of IF&Vs. The majority of the respondents believed that IF&Vs were healthier, less expensive and more visually attractive than exotic varieties. Consumption of the selected IF&Vs was generally high among the sample size. There were more households that consumed each of the selected IF&Vs than those that did not consume. Most of the selected IF&Vs were consumed only in summer and consumed on a weekly basis rather than daily or monthly basis. Age, marital status, occupation, education level and household size, as well as, perceptions of indigenous fruits’ longevity promotion, health beneficiation and relative visual attractiveness were found to be significant determinants of indigenous fruit consumption. On the other hand, the education level, in addition to perceptions of indigenous vegetables’ comparative healthiness, longevity promotion, health beneficiation and preparative ease were significant determinants of respondents’ indigenous vegetable consumption.

Présentation (SEALS)

Version intégrale

Page publiée le 18 mai 2020