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Accueil du site → Master → Afrique du Sud → 2018 → Household’s perceptions and determinants of participation in harvesting rangeland products : The case of Dyamala community, Raymond Mhlaba Local Municipality, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

University of Fort Hare (2018)

Household’s perceptions and determinants of participation in harvesting rangeland products : The case of Dyamala community, Raymond Mhlaba Local Municipality, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

Mdiya, Lwandiso

Titre : Household’s perceptions and determinants of participation in harvesting rangeland products : The case of Dyamala community, Raymond Mhlaba Local Municipality, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

Auteur : Mdiya, Lwandiso

Université de soutenance : University of Fort Hare

Grade : Masters of Agriculture (Agricultural Extension) 2018

Résumé
The study reviews the household’s perceptions and determinants of sustainable products harvesting. Communal rangelands are vast natural landscapes in the form of grasslands, shrubs, woodlands, wetlands and deserts with multiple functions to the rural households. Most rural communities share boundaries and interact with rangelands for multiple socioeconomic and environmental reasons. Since most of these interactions are external to the price mechanism, the actual contribution of rangelands to communities has largely been missed. In an effort to appraise and explore the communal rangeland contribution to households, a study from Dyamala community in the Raymond Mhlaba Local Municipality under Amathole District in Eastern Cape was conducted using cross-sectional data. Descriptive results revealed that the majority of the respondents (71 percent) from the study area positively perceived communal rangelands as safety nets. however, there also emerged a fair share of challenges namely, (bad spirit, host predators, compete with arable land) leading to negative perceptions towards communal rangelands. It was also evident that, the majority of respondents from the study area use communal rangelands for fuel wood, construction poles, traditional medicine, with minor harvests of wild food (flora and fauna) and thatch grass. The results of the study also revealed that, rural people depend more on social grants for their income followed by incomes from remittances, agricultural activities and communal rangelands. However, it was established from the results that though communal rangelands provided commercial products capable of generating household income, rangeland users trading such products were receiving meagre incomes. This might be caused by the lack of institutional support to rural households thus, the low incomes received from communal rangelands. To that effect, main communal rangeland products such as, fuel wood, poles and medicine were cited as being more valuable for local domestic use than for the external market. Regression estimates further indicated that participation in communal rangeland products harvesting is more conditioned by perception-related factors as compared to socioeconomic attributes of rural households worth understanding for strategic targeting to promote their conservation. The extant literature and the study results, evidently show that communal rangelands provide a livelihood among rural households although it has a low direct household income potential.

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