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Durban University of Technology (DUT) 2018

Integrated hydrological modelling for sustainable water allocation planning : Mkomazi Basin, South Africa case study

Amoo, Taiwo Oseni

Titre : Integrated hydrological modelling for sustainable water allocation planning : Mkomazi Basin, South Africa case study

Auteur : Amoo, Taiwo Oseni

Université de soutenance : Durban University of Technology (DUT)

Grade : Doctor of Engineering 2018

Résumé partiel
Allocation of freshwater resources between societal needs and natural ecological systems is of great concern for water managers. This development has challenged decision-makers regarding how to reasonably allocate available water resources to meet the competing demands. Thus, turning these concerns into opportunities requires the need for both water technology innovation and water behavioural change, in order to manage fresh water in a sustainable manner. This study aimed at investigating the applicability of an integrated hydrological model in a Geographical Information Systems (GIS) environment for sustainable water allocation planning and management, using the Mkomazi Basin in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa, as a case study. Specifically, the study identified ecosystems that depend on Mkomazi River for preservation of their environmental and public benefit values ; developed a water allocation mechanism to achieve equitable water distribution and large benefits from water uses across the basin’s users ; synthesised rules for sustainable development in sharing the limited water resources and maintaining environmental quality ; and finally, established a framework for water trading in order to encourage water use efficiency and allow movement of water to new users. Historical 15-year (1990-2015) observed streamflows and daily meteorological variables (precipitation sums (mm), relative humidity (%), wind speed (m s_1), mean, minimum and maximum air temperature (oC), solar radiation (MJ/m2), sunshine duration (h) and evapotranspiration (mm)) were used for this study. The hydro-meteorological data collected from various sources were subjected to frequency trend analysis, correlation, regression and the double mass curve to test their accuracy, reliability, homogeneity, consistency and localisation gaps. The ombro-thermic diagram was used to classify the months into wet and dry periods. The identification of prominent ecosystems that depend on the Mkomazi River was achieved through a comprehensive desktop survey and documentation acquired from the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS). Multivariate statistical methods ; cluster, factor and principal component analysis, were applied to analyse the surface water quality data sets extracted from the repository of South Africa’s water resources website (WR2012), in other assess their impact on the aquatic net benefit values and environmental preservation. A semi-distributed event process and an integrated Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model in a GIS environment, with descriptive statistical of mean, median, mode, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis were employed to simulate the basin’s hydrological process in evaluating the basin’s water balance. The SWAT model was parameterised, calibrated and validated from corrected hydro-meteorological data from 2004 to 2013. Sequential Uncertainty Fitting Algorithm (SUFI2) was used for the model sensitivity analysis, calibration and validation of the model.

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