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University of Zululand (2016)

Impact of soil acidity on groundnut productivity in Mpumalanga and KwaZulu - Natal Province

Vilane, Nkiza Michael

Titre : Impact of soil acidity on groundnut productivity in Mpumalanga and KwaZulu - Natal Province

Auteur : Vilane, Nkiza Michael

Université de soutenance : University of Zululand

Grade : MSc Agriculture (Agronomy) 2016

Résumé partiel
Groundnut [Arachis hypogaea L.] is grown on sandy or sandy loam soil by the smallholders in the lowveld region of Mpumalanga and the Northern coast of KwaZulu-Natal. These soils are highly susceptible to leaching, which leads to acid-soil infertility. The goal of the current study was to examine the fertility status of the soils where groundnuts are grown traditionally in Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal in relation to groundnut production with a special emphasis on acid soil infertility factors which include low pH, nutrient deficiencies and toxic levels of manganese [Mn]. First, a soil survey was conducted in the two areas to assess the fertility status of the soils, in which chemical analyses were done for the top 10 cm, 10-40 cm and 40-60 cm soil depth layer. This was followed by two sets of field experiments that examined the performance of groundnut in these soils with and without lime application. The first experiment [Experiment 1] compared the yield performance of 16 groundnut Varieties in very acid soils at Manguzi in the Northern KwaZulu-Natal and Lowveld College of Agriculture farm near Nelspruit in Mpumalanga lowveld during the 2008-2009 season. In the second experiment [Experiment 2], six varieties selected from Experiment 1 were tested in acid soils during the 2009-2010 season to determine their yield responses to three rates [0, 750 and 1500 kg/ha] of calcitic and dolomitic limes at the Lowveld College of Agriculture farm and calcitic lime at Manguzi. The soils were generally acidic at both sites and low in mineral nutrients. The soils at Nelspruit were particularly deficient in K [22 to 107 mg/kg], and low in Ca [136 to 445 mg/kg] and Mg [ 28 to 96.6 mg/kg] and differed in this respect from the soils at Manguzi which had higher K [126 to 200 mg/kg], Ca [396 to 1277 mg/kg] and Mg [111 to 166 mg/kg] concentrations whose ranges were substantially above the ranges [40 to 88 mg/kg for K, 100 to 250 mg/kg for Ca and 10 to 30 mg/kg for Mg] considered adequate for groundnut

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